Men criticise Kampala women’s new tattoo craze

Men criticise Kampala women’s new tattoo craze
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Tattoos, once castigated, are now slowly getting accepted. But are they good? And, more importantly, should girls own them?

It is okay for a woman to try all sorts of things to look good, Richard, 34, says, but it hits boundaries when she resorts to injecting herself with a glaring painting under her skin.

“No man on Earth … ever sits down and thinks: man, you know what would make her even sexier? A caterpillar inscribed over her behind,” says Richard.

The number of women with tattoos in Uganda currently is noteworthy, in Kampala especially. Musicians may take the most part, but there is a good count of other women with tattoos, even students. Considering the trend, we may end up with more women with tattoos than men.

To get a good review, experts and people with experience gave in their ideas on what they think of women with tattoos.

They’re sl*ts

When you see a girl with a tattoo, Richard claims; you are looking at someone who’ll b**g you without wasting so much of your time. If you’re scouting for that fantasy chic who’ll take you through all the vile sex styles, Tom, 34, says, pick the one whose body has been painted beyond recovery.

Tom adds a clincher: “what kind of girl feels comfortable lying down half-naked (or fully naked) in a room while some gross dude – she’s just met, plunges a sharp needle into her skin? Answer: the kind of girl who lives to please men.”

Richard speaks from a position of authority: “one of the first girls I ever banged had countless piercings and a creepy expanse of a tattoo – from her belly button to the entrance of her ‘candy’,” he says. And in spite of being in a relationship, “she went on to bang two other guys while at campus.”

They have no foresight

Even in our morally corrupt society, people with noticeable tattoos have difficulty getting jobs. “Aside from bars and hotels, maybe, it’s hard for a chic with a tattoo to get a job,” says Tom, and he snidely goes on: Girls who get inked (knowing the ink will never be removed) are showing that they can’t be trusted to plan for the future.

All these types of women care about are their individualities at the moment, Tom argues, and not what could happen later. “Who can employ such a loser?” Tom says rhetorically.

They’re selfish

According to Muganzi, 45, women get tattoos with a mind-set of “I’m doing it for ME – screw what the world says.” And this to me is indicative of narcissism and mild psychopathy, he says.

Muganzi maintains that a girl who wilfully changes her body with such a reason will never consider pleasing you, much less your feelings. “She will refuse to sleep with you for completely groundless reasons – and will later turn into a moody, unlikable person.”

Expert opinion

According to Dr Andrew Mulinde, a practicing industrial psychologist in Wandegeya – when he spoke to 20 human resource managers about their reaction to interviewees with visible tattoos, most respondents agreed that visible tattoos are a humiliation.

In fact, one of the managers told me – he says, ‘they make a person look dirty’, which subconsciously stops managers from employing them.

Mulinde explains that manager feared a statement a worker with tattoos would register in a customer’s mind. The customers may perceive them as despicable, repugnant, unpleasant and nauseating.

Mulinde, however, advises against people looking at tattoos as signifiers of a bad upbringing or a dangerous personality.

Some people still think of tattooing as exotic and unconventional, which of course it isn’t, Ruth Namulinda, a tattoo artist says, no doubt some people still find them intimidating.

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